My last post, “ENGINEERING SALARIES KEEP GROWING”, gave the starting salaries for various engineering disciplines.  Well, engineering is one profession in which specialized training is absolutely necessary, at least in my opinion.  In other words, you have to go to school.  You have to be instructed.  Now please do not get me wrong, on the job training or internship is great to have and demonstrates the real world to entry-level engineers.  Engineering student on coop programs have realized that for years.   The profession today is extremely complex due to the digital age, 5 G, IIoT, AI, RFID, computer simulation, etc.  I could go on and on but will not.  With that being the case, let us now take a look at those universities that provide a graduate with the best starting salary.  Here we go.

NUMBER 20:  Kettering University

Early Career Salary   $71,000

Mid-Career Salary     $130,900

Kettering University (formerly General Motors Institute of Technology and GMI Engineering and Management Institute) is a nationally-ranked STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and Business university in Flint, Michigan and a national leader in combining a rigorous academic environment. (Image source: Kettering University)

NUMBER 19: The United States Coast Guard Academy

 Early Career Salary   $71,900

Mid-Career Salary     $134,000

The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA) is the service academy of the United States Coast Guard, founded in 1876 and located in New London, Connecticut. It is the smallest of the five federal service academies and provides education to future Coast Guard officers. (Image source: US Coast Guard Academy)

NUMBER 18: The University of California, San Diego

 Early Career Salary   $65,100

Mid-Career Salary     $135,500

The University of California, San Diego is a public research university located in the La Jolla neighborhood of San Diego, California, in the United States. The university occupies 2,141 acres near the coast of the Pacific Ocean with the main campus resting on approximately 1,152 acres. (Image source: University of California – San Diego)

NUMBER 17:  Clarkson University

Early Career Salary   $67,900

Mid-Career Salary     $137,500

Clarkson University is a private research university with its main campus located in Potsdam, New York, and additional graduate program and research facilities in New York State’s Capital Region and Beacon, N.Y. It was founded in 1896 and has an enrollment of about 4,300 students. (Image source: Clarkson University)

NUMBER 16: Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art

Early Career Salary   $71,600

Mid-Career Salary     $138,600

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, commonly known as Cooper Union or The Cooper Union and informally referred to, especially during the 19th century, as “the Cooper Institute”, is a private college at Cooper Square on the border of the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, NY. (Image source: Cooper Union)

NUMBER 15:  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Early Career Salary $72,200

Mid-Career Salary $138,600

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a private research university and space-grant institution located in Troy, New York, with two additional campuses in Hartford and Groton, Connecticut. The Institute was established in 1824 by Stephen van Rensselaer and Amos Eaton. (Image source: Rensselaer Polytechnic)

NUMBER 14:  Georgia Institute of Technology

Early Career Salary   $73,700

Mid-Career Salary     $138,700

The Georgia Institute of Technology (commonly called Georgia Tech, Tech, and GT) is a public research university in Atlanta, Georgia, in the United States. It is a part of the University System of Georgia and has satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia; Metz, France; Athlone, Ireland; Shanghai, China and other locations. (Image source: Georgia Tech)

NUMBER 13: Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 

Early Career Salary   $76,200

Mid-Career Salary     $138,800

Rose–Hulman Institute of Technology (abbreviated RHIT), formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small private college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics and science. Its 1,300-acre (2.0 sq mi; 526.1 ha) campus is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. (Image source: Rose-Hulman)

NUMBER 12:  Carnegie Mellon University

Early Career Salary   $78,300

Mid-Career Salary     $141,000

Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) is a private nonprofit research university based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools, the university became the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1912 and began granting four-year degrees. (Image source: Carnegie Mellon University)

NUMBER 11:  Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Early Career Salary   $75,200

Mid-Career Salary     $142,100

Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is a private research university in Worcester, Massachusetts, focusing on the instruction and research of technical arts and applied sciences. Founded in 1865 in Worcester, WPI was one of the United States’ first engineering and technology universities. (Image source: Worcester Polytechnic)

NUMBER 10: US Merchant Marine Academy

Early Career Salary   $82,900

Mid-Career Salary     $143,500

The United States Merchant Marine Academy (also known as USMMA or Kings Point), one of the five United States service academies, is located in Kings Point, New York. It is charged with training officers for the United States Merchant Marine, branches of the military, and the transportation industry. (Image source: US Merchant Marine Academy)

NUMBER 9: Colorado School of Mines

Early Career Salary   $76,200

Mid-Career Salary     $143,600

Colorado School of Mines, also referred to as “Mines”, is a public teaching and research university in Golden, Colorado, devoted to engineering and applied science, with special expertise in the development and stewardship of the Earth’s natural resources. (Image source: Colorado School of Mines)

NUMBER 8: Lehigh University

Early Career Salary   $70,500

Mid-Career Salary     $143,700

Lehigh University is an American private research university in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. It was established in 1865 by businessman Asa Packer. Its undergraduate programs have been coeducational since the 1971–72 academic year. As of 2014, the university had 4,904 undergraduate students and 2,165 graduate students. (Image source: Lehigh University)

NUMBER 7:  Stevens Institute of Technology

Early Career Salary   $76,200

Mid-Career Salary     $145,800

Stevens Institute of Technology (SIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Hoboken, New Jersey. The university also has a satellite location in Washington, D.C. Incorporated in 1870, it is one of the oldest technological universities in the United States. (Image source: Stevens Institute of Technology)

NUMBER 6:  Webb Institute

Early Career Salary   $80,900

Mid-Career Salary     $145,800

Webb Institute is a private undergraduate engineering college in Glen Cove, New York on Long Island. Each graduate of Webb Institute earns a Bachelor of Science degree in naval architecture and marine engineering. Successful candidates for admission receive full tuition for four years. (Image source: Webb Institute)

NUMBER 5:  California Institute of Technology

Early Career Salary   $89,900

Mid-Career Salary     $156,900

The California Institute of Technology (abbreviated Caltech) is a private doctorate-granting research university located in Pasadena, California, United States. Known for its strength in natural science and engineering, Caltech is often ranked as one of the world’s top-ten universities. (Image source: Caltech)

NUMBER 4:   US Naval Academy

Early Career Salary   $85,000

Mid-Career Salary     $158,800

The United States Naval Academy (also known as USNA, Annapolis, or simply Navy) is a four-year coeducational federal service academy adjacent to Annapolis, Maryland. Established on 10 October 1845, under Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft. (Image source: US Naval Academy)

NUMBER 3: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Early Career Salary $89,900

Mid-Career Salary $159,400

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, MIT adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction. (Image source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

NUMBER 2:  Stanford University

Early Career Salary   $83,500

Mid-Career Salary     $161,400

Stanford University (officially Leland Stanford Junior University, colloquially the Farm) is a private research university in Stanford, California. Stanford is known for its academic strength, wealth, proximity to Silicon Valley, and ranking as one of the world’s top universities. (Image source: Stanford)

NUMBER 1:   Harvey Mudd College

Early Career Salary   $90,700

Mid-Career Salary     $161,800

Harvey Mudd College (HMC) is a private residential undergraduate science and engineering college in Claremont, California. It is one of the institutions of the contiguous Claremont Colleges which share adjoining campus grounds. (Image source: Harvey Mudd College)


Jacob Beningo – May 21, 2013

NOTE:  Jacob Beningo is a lecturer and consultant on embedded system design. He works with companies to develop quality and robust products and overcome their embedded design challenges.

The following article was written by Mr. Jacob Beningo for EDN Network Today.  Even though this is a “reblog” I certainly feel it is worth posting through Cielotech and Word Press.  The information is extremely valuable, not only for engineering graduates, but should have application for individuals seeking employment in other professions.   I have modified Mr. Beningo’s post to some degree adding my comments as I feel necessary.

It’s that time of the year again where spring is in full force, the sun is shining, birds are chirping and this year’s college graduates are spreading their wings and sending out resumes. Despite at least four years of schooling and tens of thousands of dollars spent on tuition, it’s unfortunate that their curriculum doesn’t include a resume 101 course or at least require students to attend a seminar on resume writing. Awkwardly crafted and abysmal resumes aren’t constrained to recent graduates but also reach into the general engineering population. This leaves the perfect opportunity to review some basic tips for handling resumes and establishing an online presence, after all, resumes are no longer limited to simple paper versions.

Tip #1 – Ignore the one page rule
For some reason, since the beginning of time there has been this notion that a resume should only be one page. It should be short and simple and provide very basic information. This is great if the plan is to be a professional job seeker. A single page, in a readable font, provides enough space to put a name, a few companies and education before there is no more room left on the page. It doesn’t provide enough space to really sell or distinguish the applicant from anyone else. Single page resumes are often looked at and quickly discarded because there is nothing on them that really catches attention. Don’t allow this outdated rule to dictate the length of a resume.   I don’t think droning on and on is advisable to telling your story is important—very important.

Tip #2 – Explicitly show experience
A potential employer is not going to take the time to read between the lines as to whether an individual has a certain type of experience or skill. Experience needs to be explicitly declared and not implied. This can be done by listing each project that was performed at a company and then providing details as to what was involved. Demonstration of problem identification and the ability to come up with a solution is critical.   I would show this experience as well as the company and dates worked by the employee.

Tip #3 – Use bullet points to improve readability
Instead of writing paragraphs about the work performed at a company or on a project, the use of bullet points is highly recommended because they can drastically improve the readability of a resume. Bullet points are a quick way to break down skills and efforts that were put into a project. They allow the potential employer to quickly skim through and catch the highlights or experience.  You do this with other presentations so why not with resume writing?
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Tip #4 – List professional experience first
College degrees always hold a special place in everyone’s heart especially after paying the enormous tuition rates that have become known to students in modern times. Unfortunately, on a resume they hold less weight than professional experience. This means that while having a degree may be necessary, they should be listed after professional experience. It seems unfair but the fact of the matter is that the first few years of one’s career are spent learning what should have been taught in higher educational institutions. Please note that professional experience was noted earlier in the paragraph. This means that coffee shops and a stint at McDonalds are not going to be of interest to your next engineering employer, so it can be removed from the experience list.

Tip #5 – If project experience is lacking, use a DIY project
Sometimes inexplicable things happen and a college student never has an internship, or an experienced engineer finds themselves on the unemployment list for a while. This can result in an employer having a hard time justifying even taking the time to talk with the candidate. This is why these gaps should be filled with learning experiences from do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. Create something and go through the design process of gathering requirements, block diagramming and prototyping and put that experience and maybe even some lessons learned on the resume! This will show the prospective employer that the individual is self-motivated, passionate and a number of other things. The best part is that when they call for an interview, the candidate can bring what was designed and talk about the process, the hardware design, the software etc. It might just give that edge needed to even beat out the competition.

Tip #6 – List useful skills
Forcing an employer to read between the lines is a dangerous game. Listing project details is one thing but an employer also wants to know in general the types of skills the candidate has. Having a technical expertise section that lists various items such as hardware, software and programming language and provide a quick overview summary of what an individual brings to the table can be very beneficial.

Tip #7 – Identify industry buzz words and use a few
At different times there are certain buzz words that take an industry by storm. They may indicate a certain type of design paradigm such as model driven design or event driven design or perhaps a new field of device such as internet-of-things or machine-to-machine. The whole point is that while the resume is being dusted off and updated, spending a little bit of time learning the current buzz words can do a lot to increase the likely hood of the resume being discovered. Of course if the buzz word doesn’t apply it should be over-looked but there will most likely be buzz words that do apply and that greatly raise the resumes visibility.

Tip #8 – Use action words
Companies like to have leaders on their teams or up and coming leaders. Leaders are action driven and employers like to look for candidates that take initiative and are on their way to becoming leaders. For this reason it is always nice to include action words that grab extra attention. Mention leading the team or managed the team or were conducting investigations to list a few. While investigating resume action words, a website with “100 Great Resume Words” popped up and after a quick review there was little argument about it.     I highly recommended you take a look.
Tip #9 – Use social media to enhance your resume
Paper is out, electronic is in. The resume in general hasn’t changed a whole lot but with social media outlets such as Linkedin and Twitter, the opportunity to enhance a resume is astounding. Linkedin can be used as an enhanced resume by duplicating the information on a resume and then filling in the extras that Linkedin allows. In today’s society there seems to be more chance of being found on a social media website first and then only after connecting with someone does a request for a resume occur. This means that social media profiles need to be just as good at attracting attention as a resume but that is an entirely different article for another day.

A few examples of some enhancements that can be made through social media are getting colleagues to verify your skills, getting recommendations and then also cross linking colleagues on projects. This provides employers with the ability to cross reference what they are being told and verify that the material is in fact real.

There has been some buzz about something called Klout that is supposed to analyze social media interactions and then rank a user based on those interactions. A value of 1 to 99 is then assigned to them. Despite all the authors’ interactions on social media sites, posting baby pictures on Facebook seems to raise the score the most. This leads the author to believe that Klout is an interesting sidebar that will most likely not be taken seriously by employers in the near future.

Be very careful when using Social Medial and make sure what you show is what you want a prospective employer to see.  Pictures of your latest binge drinking episode just might not get you the interview or the job.

Tip #10 – Review and update quarterly
The worst time to update a resume is when an individual is looking for a job. Going for long periods of time without updates usually results in gaps of information or misrepresentation from just forgetting what was done. That is why it is useful to set a periodic time, whether it is every quarter or twice a year to sit down and update the resume with new projects, skills, etc. Sometimes employers will include employee resumes in proposals in order to show a potential client that their team has the skills necessary to get the job done. If a resume isn’t kept up to date then the team could quickly look like they are not up-to-date with the latest and greatest techniques and cause the employer to lose business.  In my opinion, this is a big one.  DO THIS.

Conclusion
I am sure there are other recommendations that could be added but telling YOUR story is what this is about.  The jury is out relative to references.  I would indicate they are available upon request.  Also, MAKE SURE YOUR RESUME HAS UPDATED INFORMATION FOR ADDRESS, TELEPHONE NUMBERS and E-MAIL ADDRESS.
               

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