Portions of this post are taken from “Design News Daily Magazine”, online version, FW 18, 2019.

I often hear there will come a time when education will be completely online, in other words, no classroom.  The teacher will lecture via the internet and all classes may come to us through video conferencing or SKYPE-like services.  I know I am ‘old-school” but I do not think that will nearly fill all requirements students have relative to obtaining enough information and structure needed to enter the workforce after graduation.  I KNOW, eliminating the classroom will not suffice as far as fulfilling an engineering degree that is usable. (Usable is the operative word here.)  There is too much give-and take in the classroom for that to occur.   Too many questions would go unanswered providing a dearth of preparation for the “outside and real” world.

The factor that just may prove me incorrect is the cost of an engineering education.  Getting an engineering degree is tough, and the soaring cost of colleges doesn’t make it any easier. For many years, college costs have been rising at twice the rate of inflation, and today’s most expensive engineering degrees reflect that, having recently cracked the seventy thousand dollars ($70,000)-a-year plateau.

To be sure, all of those seventy thousand plus schools offer financial aid, often in substantial amounts. In some cases, the final dollar figure may be comparable to that of a state school after all the aid is totaled up. That, of course, is if the applicant receives financial aid. I am using current figures from US News & World Reports Best Colleges, and have put together a list of the most expensive engineering schools in the US. All of the colleges on the list offer great educations. You really need to sit down for this one.  Here we go.

1. Harvey Mudd College, $75,003. The country’s most expensive engineering degree belongs to a school that may not have the Harvard- or MIT-name-brand, but nevertheless features a top-notch engineering program. In this year’s edition of US News & World Reports Best Colleges, Mudd tied for first as the best engineering program among schools where the top degree is a bachelors or masters. A tiny school with just 844 students, Mudd takes a different approach to education. A big part of the school’s method involves fellowships for students, enabling them to make a strong connection between engineering theory and the real world. The final cost — $75,003 – includes tuition, room and board. About 50% of “Mudders,” as its students are known, receive financial aid, with $43,208 being the average package. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Imagine)

2. Columbia University, $73,446. Columbia University’s engineering school is the country’s third oldest, and is ranked 18th among schools whose highest degree is a Ph.D. The New York City-based college is extremely selective, offering entry to only about 6% of applicants. The average accepted applicant has an ACT score ranging between 32-35, with 96% in the top 10% of their class. Financial aid is generous – averaging about $58,000 – but only about half of incoming students receive such aid. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Andrew Chen)

3. University of Southern California, $71,625. As private universities go, USC is a whopper, with about 18,000 undergraduates, of which about 10% are enrolled in engineering. US News & World Report ranks USC’s Viterbi Engineering School 24th among colleges whose highest degree is a Ph.D. Departments include mechanical, aerospace, astronautical, biomedical, industrial, chemical, electrical, and civil. About 38% of admitted students receive financial aid, with the average package being $51,509. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Bestweekevr)

4. University of Pennsylvania, $71,200. A private university in the Ivy League, the University of Pennsylvania is both a great and expensive source of education. Its engineering school is legendary for its development of the first general-purpose computer, ENIAC, in 1946. US News & World Report ranks it 24th among engineering schools whose highest degree is a Ph.D. About 46% of students receive financial aid, with the average package being $48,971. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Bryan Y.W. Shin)

5. Northwestern University, $71,193. Northwestern University in Evanston, IL features one of the premier engineering colleges in the US, with a ranking of 14th from US News & World Report. It is, however, extremely selective, with only about 9% of candidates accepted. The average incoming ACT is 32-35, and 91% of accepted applicants are in the top 10% of their high school class. About 45% of undergrads receive financial aid, with the average package coming to $49,030. (Image source: Wikipedia)

6. Tufts University, $70,942. Tufts University of Medford, MA, isn’t a household name, but it’s a stellar, highly selective school. In 2019, only 14% of applicants were admitted, and the average incoming student had an ACT score ranging from 31-34. About 9% of Tufts’ small undergrad population (enrollment, 5,483) is enrolled in the engineering curriculum. Its engineering school is ranked 59th among those whose highest degree is a Ph.D. Financial aid is awarded to 38% of applicants. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Halpaugh)

7. Dartmouth College, $70,791. New Hampshire-based Dartmouth College is a liberal arts school, and as such gives a bachelor of arts degree (B.A.) to all engineering science majors, then encourages them to stay on and earn a Bachelor of Engineering (B.E.) degree. Like all Ivy League schools, it’s extremely selective, with only about 10% of applicants gaining admission. Dartmouth’s Thayer School of Engineering is ranked 48th among schools whose top degree is a Ph.D. About 50% of undergrads receive financial aid, with the average package coming to $50,625. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Kane5187)

8. Brown University, $70,326. Brown University in Providence, RI, is yet another of the highly-selective Ivies, with only about 8% of applicants being admitted. It’s engineering college, which makes up about 6% of Brown’s undergrad population, is ranked 38th among schools whose highest degree is a Ph.D. About 44% of new students receive financial aid, with the average package being $49,269. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Apavio

9. Smith College, $69,924. Smith College in Northampton, MA is typically thought of as a liberal arts school, and is in fact rated 11th among all the nation’s liberal arts colleges by US News & World Report. Still, the small all-women’s school completed a new science and engineering facility in 2009, with the idea that it would “blur the boundaries between traditional disciplines, creating an optimum environment for students and faculty to address key scientific and technological developments of our time.” Smith’s engineering program is ranked 15th among schools whose top degree is a bachelors or masters. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Samasinter)

10. Carnegie Mellon University, $69,883. Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh has long been regarded as one of the nation’s premier engineering schools. In 2019, US News & World Report ranked it sixth among schools whose highest degree is a Ph.D. The university is relatively small, with an undergrad population of just 6,664, but engineering makes up a whopping 24% of those students. Carnegie Mellon is world-renown for its work in robotics, with many of its grad students filling key spots in companies making autonomous cars. About 39% of undergrads receive financial aid, with the average package being $43,182. (Image source: Wikipedia/by Dllu).

CONCLUSION:  You will notice that MIT, Stanford, Georgia Tech, Duke, Rose-Hulman, University of Wisconsin, Perdue, etc. were not even mentioned.  These are remarkable schools when considering an engineering degree.  Really, most accredited engineering universities do an excellent job, certainly for undergraduate work leading to a BS in engineering.  Look at the faculty, the location, the cost and you will do just fine choosing a university that meets all of your engineering-student needs.

Advertisements

Several years ago I traveled with three (3) other guys to participate in the 50th annual Rattlesnake Roundup.  We considered ourselves to be of sound mind although the subject remains for debate.  The annual event is held in Sweetwater, Texas, which is just west of Abilene or about 1,012.12 miles from our east Tennessee location.  Each person drove four (4) hours non-stop, one-way for this adventure.  It took approximately sixteen (16) hours. (Then again, who’s counting?)  I don’t know if you have ever been to Sweetwater but it’s as flat as a table, hot as hell (even in March), dusty as the Sahara and the wind ALWAYS blows.  Even with this being the case, the residents were absolutely convinced the city was the Garden of Eden. “No place I would rather be”, was a frequent comment, even with rattlesnakes in the front yard.  I suppose we all feel that way about our home town.  I certainly do. Well, there are other towns that might not warrant that high praise.  Places more toxic and considerably less desirable.

Forbes Magazine recently published an article called “The Most Miserable Cities in the United States”. They based their examination on the following criteria for the 2013 calendar year:

  • Level of violent crime
  • Unemployment rate
  • Home foreclosures
  • Net migration from city
  • Traffic congestion
  • Local and state taxes
  • Commute times
  • Weather

A fairly complete and meaningful list of specifications for the ranking.

With this being the case, I have listed in reverse order what residents indicate to be the most miserable cities in the United States.  Here we go:

20.) Youngstown, Ohio

19.) Gary, Indiana

18.) Poughkeepsie, New York

17.) Cleveland, Ohio

16.) Atlanta, Georgia

15.) Atlantic City, New Jersey

14.) Milwaukee, Wisconsin

13.) Camden, New Jersey

12.) St. Louis, Missouri

11.) Toledo, Ohio

10.) New York, New York

9.) Lake County, Illinois

8.) Stockton, California

7.) Warren, Michigan

6.) Vallejo, California

5.) Modesto, California

4.) Chicago, Illinois

3.) Rockford, Illinois

2.) Flint, Michigan

1.) Detroit, Michigan

In doing the count, we conclude the following:

  • Three from Ohio
  • Three from Michigan
  • Three from Illinois
  • Three from California
  • Two from New Jersey
  • Two from New York

This list was compiled with no political input considered, just the factors given above.  No Democrat vs. Republican—just the eight (8) items mentioned.  I have been to over half the cities on this list and found them to be nice places to visit.  I honestly feel that when (and if) our economy ever returns to livable conditions and employment improves, turn-a-round will be definitely possible.    Crime remains a HUGE issue with the inner-city.  Gang and drug violence will be forever with us I fear.  I’m not too sure how we deal with that.

FDR was correct when he said, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself”.  Our politicians need to step up, make something happen, forget their “base”, forget their legacy, forget reelection, throw together for the betterment of the populace, and lose the special interest groups.      They can and possibly should be replaced!   I welcome your comments.

%d bloggers like this: