CHATTANOOGA—INTERNATIONAL LOCATION FOR MANUFACTURING

October 13, 2016


I think everyone is very proud of their home state and city.  Most in this “neck of the woods” would not live any other place than Chattanooga, Tennessee.  It hasn’t always been that way.  We were at one time one of the most polluted cities in the United States.    The copy from the Chattanooga Times will indicate the conditions we all lived with during the 1960s.

CHATTANOOGA city councilman Dave Crockett remembers when the dust and smoke in the air of this Tennessee city were so thick people turned on their car headlights at noon and businessmen brought an extra white shirt to work. That was in the 1960s when federal authorities said Chattanooga had the worst air pollution of any city in the United States.

In 1969, a U.S. survey of the countries air quality confirmed that Chattanooga was the worst city in the U.S. for particulate matter in the air. Before the Clean Air Act in 1970, in 1969, Chattanooga created its own legislation called the Air Pollution Control Ordinance. It controlled emissions of sulfur oxides, allowed open burning by permit only, placed regulations on odors and dust, outlawed visible auto emissions, capped sulfur content of fuel at four percent (4%,) and limited visible emissions from industry. Additionally, new pollution monitoring techniques were set in place to make sure these regulations were being followed.

That condition has long since been altered. As a result, the city has attracted a great number of business with many being foreign companies.  Clean air, welcoming environmental conditions, access to great transportation, willing workforce and affordable housing have made Chattanooga a very desirable place to live and work.

Much can be said for the entire state of Tennessee.  As you can see from the digital photograph below, twelve (12) countries have placed manufacturing locations within Tennessee borders and we are talking about multiple sites for those investments. These companies employ approximately 81,800 men and women.

investment2

In looking at the largest foreign-based companies in Tennessee, we see the following.

investment3

One facility just coming on line is the Wacker facility in Savanna, Tennessee. Wacker is by far, the most expensive facility at $2.5 billion.  The company has been extremely methodical in researching a proper site for their facility and training employees to work in that facility.  Many have made the trip to Germany for training.  It has been a great experience for the Chattanooga area.  A photograph of Wacker was given by the Sunday paper.  Very brief stats are given as follows:

Project Highlights:

  • US $2.5 billion plant investment–the largest single private manufacturing investment ever in     Tennessee
  • 650 new jobs
  • 20,000 metric ton capacity
  • 550-acre greenfield site
  • The plant will produce 20,000 tons of polysilicon annually at full capacity.
  • The plant was built with expansion in mind, noting the current facility is only using about 40 percent of its land. Wacker as a worldwide company produces a broad range of products.

 

When fully operational, the facility will employ right at 2,000 people.  An amazing addition to our East Tennessee area.

wacher2

You can get a much better feel for the size of the facility by looking at an aerial view.

wacker-3

One additional inducement for locating your facilities in Chattanooga, is Chattanooga downtown.  We are having a movement from the “burbs” to the downtown area simply due to the fact that there is a great deal to do in the downtown area.  Great places to eat, sights to see and one of the most vibrant outdoor communities in the United States.  Come on down for a visit.

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