2016 ENGINEERING SALARY SURVEY

October 10, 2016


The following post is taken from information supplied by the publication “Machine Design”.  Each year Machine Design asks information from its readers’ questions relative to the engineering profession.  Given below are results from this survey.

PROFILE OF A TYPICAL ENGINEER

I really don’t think anyone is “typical”.  We each are unique individuals with a story to tell, but Machine Design uses this word to give us a snapshot of engineering as it exists today.

According to the Machine Design 2016 Survey, the majority of our readers are white males with seventy-four percent (74%) of our readers are age fifty (50) and older.  This to me is really troublesome because it indicates that seventy-four percent have approximately ten to twelve years before retirement.  Not much time to backfill with younger engineers.   A little more than half, fifty-eight percent (58%) work as design and development engineers.  This percentage is down from last year (61.7% in 2015). Engineering and operational management comprise 19.3% of current principal job functions. These engineers have the job title of chief, senior, executive, or lead engineer. At least fifty-five percent (55%) of our readers work forty (40) to fifty (50) hours a week.

THE FUTURE OF ENGINEERING

The future of engineering is still bright in the eyes of many current engineers. Over the last five years this view point has not changed and ninety-one percent (91%) would recommend engineering as a profession. When asked how they feel the engineering field is changing, one engineer spoke to our correspondent stating that the fields of engineering are merging. “The lines are currently blurring between mechanical and electrical engineer. Increasingly we are specifying electrical components required to accomplish motion. It is becoming important to have a basic understanding of the limitations of control systems and their impact on the mechanical systems being designed.”  The field of Mecatronics exemplifies this fact.   As the world of Internet of Things or IoT continues to expand, we will see more of how the engineering worlds combine.

Let us now take a quick look at where the engineering profession stands in general.  The graphics give a very interesting picture.

typical-engineer

I find it very interesting that seventy-seven percent (77%) have twenty plus yeas of experience with those over sixty years in age steadily increasing.  As metntioned earlier, time to begin replacing those considering retirement within the next ten to fifteen years with younger engineers.  Regardless of how bright the younger engineering community is, experience and training play a great role in success.  The “old guys” can aid these efforts in a great manner.

work-location

You see from the graphic above the larger percentages of engineering involvement across our country.  There is a predominance, ten percent (10%) involvement in California alone.  I suspect Silicone Valley contributes greatly to this larger enclave of engineering talent.

compensation

We are all interested in how we “stack up” relative to salary levels and bonuses levels.  The numbers above give a fairly good picture of averages across the profession.  I was very surprised to see over eleven percent (11%) increase in salary from 2014.  This, as mentioned, indicates the market is improving OR engineering talent is harder to come by.  Engineers can now pick and choose where they wish to spend time. $99,933 as an average salary is huge in my opinion but justified.

salary-by-experience

As you might expect, as you gain experience your salary level should and does increase.  Those with forty plus years’ experience can expect $100K plus in salary.

job-satisfaction

By and large, the engineering community is satisfied with their job with less than two percent (2%) being not satisfied at all.  I suspect this is company related and with opportunities available job changes are in order.

employment-outlook

I was looking for a job when I found this one.  Fifty-nine plus percent (55.9%) indicate they would be open to changing jobs is that opportunity became available.  In looking at results from the last two years, this is not out of line at all.  As with the last five years, challenges, research and benefits to society rank very highly as desirable features of any one given job.  Engineers have a higher calling than money itself.  That has always been apparent.

outsourcing1

In our lives today, the fear of engineering positions being outsourced is a very real concern.  Manufacturing jobs in particular seem to be targeted.  Some of this is definitely due to the onerous tax code our country is forcing manufacturers to live under.  Also, regulations remain a significant burden to manufacturers.

outsourcing2

concerns

The concerns within the engineering community are shared by other professions.  We are definitely not alone in that regard.  Time, people and money to accomplish any one given mission is uppermost in the minds of working engineers.  This is very much in line with the last five years of reporting.

education-and-training

This chart speaks for itself.  The oldest question in the world: “Which is more desirable in the engineering profession, “book learning” or practice?  ANSWER: There is nothing more practical that education.  You’ve heard this year after year.  Engineering education is changing though and for the better.  We are seeing more and more schools adopt a hands-on approach to engineering training.  This does not replace classroom work but does supplement the in-class experience.

whats-keeping-engineers-up-at-night

Trust me on this one, engineers are worriers.  That makes us no different than individuals in most professions.  The graphic above fully illustrates those areas of concern.

iot

IoT is looming. IoT will, if not already, become a huge factor for every design engineer.  I might add, IoT AND “big data” are infusing themselves into the daily lives of the engineering community.  It’s happening and engineers need to realize that reality.

changes

The chart above might be considered to be a continuation of concerns the engineering community has, particularly increasing regulation.

CONCLUSION:  I think this annual survey is extremely valuable and provides a gage for practicing engineers.  Comparisons are always interesting.

 

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